AMOS & CELIA HEILICHER MINNEAPOLIS JEWISH DAY SCHOOL

Cooking with Chef Liz - Kosher Recipes for Your Holiday Table

Thanksgiving is coming soon and making all of us here at Heilicher hungry. Whether you have been daydreaming about your favorite foods or dreading cooking for a crowd, Thanksgiving is a time to reflect upon things you are grateful for and spend time with those you love. Chef Liz Kaplan shares some of her favorite foods you can make with your kids this holiday season. 

Green Beans for the Kosher Table 

1 package (8 oz) sliced button mushrooms

1 large portobello mushroom, gills removed and sliced

2 cloves garlic, minced

3 Tablespoons olive oil

2# cleaned green beans 

Salt and pepper to taste

1 package french fried onions

1/2 cup sliced toasted almonds

Place a large pot of water to boil on stove. Once it boils, add enough salt to taste like the sea. Boil green beans until tender, different beans will vary in time (I recommend cooking them a bit past al dente for this recipe). Drain green beans and set aside.

In a large sauté pan over medium high heat, sauté the garlic in the olive oil. Add the mushrooms and cook until they release their juices, about 5 minutes. Remove from heat and mix with green beans. Place in a glass baking dish. You may cool and keep in fridge for a day at this point. Then, top with almonds and onions. Place in a 400°F oven for 20-30 minutes or until warm. 

 

Festive Salad 

My children love this salad, full of fruit and surprisingly fresh fennel, which my daughter always tells me tastes like candy. It is beautiful for your Thanksgiving or Hanukah table!


1.5 cups (about 1 medium) fresh fennel sliced very thin, you can use a mandolin slicer. 

6-8 clementines peeled and segmented

1 cup pomegranate seeds

1/4 red onion sliced thin

4 large handfuls spinach

1 heart of romaine sliced thin

1/2 toasted and chopped pistachios

 

Dressing

Blend the following in a blender: 

1 Tablespoon Dijon mustard

2 Tablespoon honey

Juice of 1/2 a large lemon

1 medium clove garlic

2 teaspoons salt and a few grinds black pepper

1 cup balsamic vinegar 

 

Then slowly drizzle into the blender 2 1/2 cups olive oil

Bon appétite! 

  • Holidays
  • Recipe

More Posts

The Passing of A Year, The Crossing of A Sea

Isn’t it ironic that we celebrate our hurried exodus from Egypt, one in which we did not even have time to let bread dough rise, with a meal that is so full of preparation and organization it is literally called “order”? The seder plate is even laid out from chazeret (lettuce) to charoset (fruit and nut mixture), helping to ensure the order of the meal is followed and no mitzvah is passed over. We scour the house in advance of the holiday, searching for chametz (forbidden foods), and we arrange to sell the rest, as a way to ensure there is none remaining in our possession at sundown on the first night of Pesach. It is remarkable that we remain so devoted to the detailed preparation of a holiday designed to mark when we went from bondage to freedom without time for even the simplest food preparation.